~Morgan Andersen, Bowmaker - Bows~

Gold Violin Grand Prix Bow - head
Gold Violin Grand Prix Bow - frog
Gold Violin Grand Prix Bow - head
Gold Violin Grand Prix Bow - frog
Gold Violin Grand Prix Bow - frog
Gold mounted violin bow 2011, winner of the Grand Prix, Etienne Vatelot City of Paris Competition 2011

Gold Violin 18th Century Bow - head
Gold Violin 18th Century Bow - frog
Gold Violin 18th Century Bow - frog
Gold Mounted Violin Bow in 18th Century Style With Curved Pearl Heel Plate

Gold Violin Bow 2013 - head
Gold Violin Bow 2013 - frog
Gold Mounted Violin Bow, 2013

Gold Cello Bow 2013 - head
Gold Cello Bow 2013 - frog
Gold Mounted Cello Bow, 2013

Silver Violin Bow 2013 - head
Silver Violin Bow 2013 - frog
Silver Mounted Violin Bow, 2013

Silver Viola Bow 2013 - head
Silver Viola Bow 2013 - frog
Silver Mounted Viola Bow, 2013

Silver Cello Bow 2013 - head
Silver Cello Bow 2013 - frog
Silver Mounted Cello Bow, 2013

Gold Violin Bow - head
Gold Violin Bow - frog
Gold Mounted Violin Bow, 2007

Gold Cello Bow - head
Gold Cello Bow - frog
Gold Mounted Cello Bow, 2009

Silver Violin Bow - head
Silver Violin Bow - frog
Silver Mounted Violin Bow, 2008

Silver Cello Bow - head
Silver Cello Bow - frog
Silver Mounted Cello Bow, 2009

The inspiration for my model derives from the generation of French bow makers between Tourte and Peccatte, or roughly the second quarter of the nineteenth century. The most influential makers of this period from are Pajeot, Persoit, Eury and Maire. I do not want my bows to look like, or copy any of them. There are certain characteristics bows of that period possess that I like to incorporate in my work to suggest the era rather than one historical maker.

I find using a variety of shapes while still creating an identifiable look more interesting than coming up with one pattern and adhering to it. It's more about developing a consistent sense of design rather than developing one particular design.

It is essential to study old bows in order to train the eye and to come up with something original that relates to the tradition in a coherent way. However, spending too much time thinking what one's original statement is going to be can create a self-consciousness quality in the work that great historical bows do not have. After looking to the old masters to develop the eye and acquire knowledge, at some point it is important to let the intellectual part of that process go, trust the eye and intuition, and let forms partly develop from one's methods and tool shapes. This for me is the path that hopefully leads to the fresh dynamic qualities we so admire in historic bows by great makers.

Andy Lim bow photo

Gold Mounted Violin Bow, 2008 Andy Lim bow photo

Silver Mounted Violin Bow, 2011 Andy Lim bow photo

Gold Mounted Violin Bow, 2010